Videos

Riding the Apalachicola River with Capt. Gill

Join us for a journey through the estuary of the Apalachicola River with Capt. Gill Autrey:

You can learn more about Capt. Gill’s River Cruises by visiting  www.captgill.com.

Here are some additional photos from our cruise on the lower Apalachicola River:

The waterfront of historic Apalachicola, Florida.
The Apalachicola River not far upstream from its mouth.
Bloody Bluff Landing was once called “Dueling Bluff.” U.S. forces occupied the bluff as a command post during the attack on the Fort at Prospect Bluff (“Negro Fort”).
Prospect Bluff, site of the British Post (later called the “Negro Fort) and Fort Gadsden, was the scene of the deadliest cannon shot in American history.
An osprey nest in the estuary of the Apalachicola River, Florida.
The beautiful marshes of the Apalachicola River estuary.

If you would like to see more about historic Apalachicola, Florida, click below for a tour of the city and its history:

USS Yorktown survivor remembers the Battle of Midway

Two Egg TV visits Roger Spooner of Seminole County, Georgia. He survived the sinking of the aircraft carrier USS Yorktown during the Battle of Midway.

This weekend marks the 75th anniversary of the World War II battle. Click play to hear Mr. Spooner’s remarkable story:

To learn more about the Battle of Midway, we highly recommend the video below from the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service:

CSS Chattahoochee: Their Dreams Exploded (New Video)

Our new documentary – CSS Chattahoochee: Their Dreams Exploded – is now available for viewing free on your tv set through our Roku channel or you can stream it right here! We hope that you enjoy it and find it to be of interest.

1842 Creek Indian attack at Orange Hill near Chipley, Florida

The Perkins attack or massacre took place somewhere on the top of Orange Hill in Washington County, Florida.
The Perkins attack or massacre took place somewhere on the top of Orange Hill in Washington County, Florida.

Orange Hill near Chipley is one of the highest hills in the State of Florida.

It was settled in the early 1800s and by 1842 was a thriving little community of farmers and planters. Among these was Stephen Perkins, a farmer and the head of a growing family that included his wife and four children.

Their dreams ended in disaster on August 31, 1842 when they were attacked by a party of Creek Indian warriors. Here is the full story:

The story of how and why the small band of Muscogee (Creek) Indians wound up in the area is equally tragic. They escaped into Florida from a concentration camp in Alabama after being attacked there by white outlaws.

From that time until 1844 they carried out occasional raids against frontier homes to obtain food, ammunition and other necessities.

When attacked in Alabama they had seen unarmed members of their group killed and assaulted and once in Florida they often took revenge during raids against frontier homes and farms.

Learn more about one such band of Creeks in this video:

New Documentary: “The Fort at Prospect Bluff” is now available!

Two Egg TV’s new documentary – “The Fort at Prospect Bluff: Story of the Negro Fort on the Apalachicola” – is now available!

You can watch it in HD on your television for free by adding Two Egg TV to your Roku player or you can watch it right here:

 

To learn more about Prospect Bluff Historic Sites, location of the “Negro Fort” and Fort Gadsden, please visit:

ExploreSouthernHistory.com: Day by Day History of the Prospect Bluff Campaign

 

        

 

 

Weeping Ridge Falls at Torreya State Park in Liberty County, Florida

WeepingRidge304x237Florida may not be known for waterfalls but some real jewels are tucked away in the northern part of the state.

Weeping Ridge Falls are often overlooked by visitors to stunning Torreya State Park, but the small waterfall was very pretty when we stopped by for a look today!

Enjoy this video visit to the falls then be sure to scroll down for photos and more information about the Weeping Ridge Trail and Falls:

Trailhead sign for the Weeping Ridge Trail at Torreya State Park in LIberty County, Florida.
Trailhead sign for the Weeping Ridge Trail at Torreya State Park in LIberty County, Florida.
Weeping Ridge Trail begins high atop the bluffs that overlook the Apalachicola River at Torreya State Park.
Weeping Ridge Trail begins high atop the bluffs that overlook the Apalachicola River at Torreya State Park.
A broken millstone alongside the trail.
A broken millstone alongside the trail.
The trail passes the Rock Bluff Indian Mound, which dates back 1,500-2,000 years.
The trail passes the Rock Bluff Indian Mound, which dates back 1,500-2,000 years.
Ravine into which the waterfall flows.
Ravine into which the waterfall flows.
Weeping Ridge Falls.
Weeping Ridge Falls.
Wildflower in bloom.
Wildflower in bloom.
A small Florida torreya tree can be seen near the waterfall overlook.
A small Florida torreya tree can be seen near the waterfall overlook.

If you enjoyed our visit to Weeping Ridge Falls, you might also enjoy this look at a rare Florida Yew tree growing at Torreya State Park:

Exploring the wreck of the paddlewheel boat Albany

The paddlewheel steamer Albany has been a landmark of Florida’s Apalachicola River for 90 years. Two Egg TV obtained special permission to visit her wreck for this story:

A U.S. government snagboat, the Albany operated on the Apalachicola, Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers from around 1928 until 1959. She was tied up and abandoned at Chattahoochee a short time later during a high water event.

Her sister ship, the Montgomery, took over snag duties and continued to operate until 1982.

Many residents of the Chattahoochee and Sneads area remember the novelty of seeing the Albany as she sat high up on the bank of the Apalachicola River. Children played on the decks and explored the empty cabins of the virtually intact steamboat.

Paddlewheel at the stern of the Albany as seen in 1961 after she was abandoned atop the riverbank at Chattahoochee, Florida.
Paddlewheel at the stern of the Albany as seen in 1961 after she was abandoned atop the riverbank at Chattahoochee, Florida.

The Albany slowly deteriorated over time, however, and all that remains today is the hull and lower deck. Even that is rapidly disappearing and in another decade or two nothing will likely be left of the historic vessel but the steel beams of her hull.

She is one of the impressive number of wrecks to be found along the banks of the Apalachicola River at Chattahoochee. The presence of the skeletons of so many paddlewheel steamers and historic wooden barges there have led the stretch of water between the Jim Woodruff Dam and the CSX railroad trestle to be dubbed “Florida’s Inland Graveyard of Ships.”

The wreck of the Albany on private property and is not open to the public. We received special permission and assistance from the owner to photograph the meager remains of the once proud government steamer.

If you enjoyed our story on the Albany, you might also enjoy our visit to the wreck of the steamboat Barbara Hunt:

Remember that you can see all of our programming on your television in high definition by adding our free channel on your Roku device, smart tv or smart phone app.

 

 

Angus Gholson Nature Park in Chattahoochee, Florida

AngusGholson209x209The Angus Gholson Nature Park in Chattahoochee is home to a remarkable system of hiking trails that take you along the magnificent bluffs and ravines of the upper Apalachicola River.

The park is located just off Morgan Avenue in Chattahoochee and offers picnicking and restrooms in addition to the beautiful trails.

These unique formations are home to some of the rarest trees and plants in the world including the Florida Torreya and Florida Yew:

You might also enjoy this look at a Florida Yew, one of the rarest trees or shrubs in the world:

Remember that you can see all of our programming on your television in high definition by adding our free channel on your Roku device, smart tv or smart phone app.

 

Curry Ferry Landing: Revolutionary War crossing point in Holmes County, Florida

Curry Ferry Landing is a boat launch on the Choctawhatchee River in Holmes County, Florida… but it is also much more!

The ferry was in use before the American Revolution and was used by British troops during that conflict. Click play to watch this fascinating story:

If you enjoyed the story of Curry Ferry Landing, you might enjoy learning about some of the other sites along the Jackson and Holmes County section of the old Pensacola – St. Augustine Road:

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