Tag Archives: georgia

Mysterious Structure on the bottom of Lake Seminole

The mysterious stone structure is now on the bottom of the Spring Creek arm of Lake Seminole.

Who built a mysterious stone structure that now rests on the bottom of Lake Seminole?

No one has seen the strange building in nearly 60 years, but speculation about it has focused on everyone from the ancient Mayans or Irish to General Andrew Jackson!

Two Egg TV has launched an expedition to find the structure. Rachael Conrad has Parts 1, 2 & 3 of our special series:

Jackson’s Oven stood near Rhodes’ Ferry Landing on Spring Creek prior to the completion of the Jim Woodruff Dam in 1958. We go beneath the waters of the lake in Part Two of this series as our search gets underway. We will post a link to that part as soon as it is available.

To read an architect’s theory on the origin of the structure, please follow this link: Who built this mysterious stone structure on the Flint River?

Click here to learn more about the Spring Creek Watershed Partnership.

Click here to learn more about 37,500 acre Lake Seminole.

 

Fort Gaines, Georgia (1816)

Fort Gaines was an important military post of the First Seminole War. It protected the Georgia frontier in 1816-1821.

The fort was named for Maj. Gen. Edmund Pendleton Gaines, a hero of the War of 1812, and was built to guard the southern border of the Creek Nation as defined by the Treaty of Fort Jackson.

Restored blockhouse of the 1816 stockade at Fort Gaines, Georgia.

The fort served as a command post for operations down the Chattahoochee and Apalachicola Rivers in 1816. This expedition by the Lt. Col. Duncan Lamont Clinch and the 4th U.S. Infantry resulted in the bloody destruction of the Fort at Prospect Bluff (called the “Negro Fort” by U.S. officials).

Fort Gaines was an important supply depot and defensive point during the First Seminole War (1817-1818) and continued to guard Southwest Georgia and Southeast Alabama until 1821.

A reconstructed blockhouse, historical marker and interpretive kiosk mark the site of the fort in today’s city of Fort Gaines, Georgia. Markers, earthworks and a Confederate cannon mark the nearby sites of the second and third Fort Gaines, which were built in the Creek War of 1836 and the War Between the States (or Civil War).

The restored blockhouse is at the edge of the bluff near 100 Bluff Street, Fort Gaines, Georgia. See the map for directions:

USS Yorktown survivor remembers the Battle of Midway

Two Egg TV visits Roger Spooner of Seminole County, Georgia. He survived the sinking of the aircraft carrier USS Yorktown during the Battle of Midway.

This weekend marks the 75th anniversary of the World War II battle. Click play to hear Mr. Spooner’s remarkable story:

To learn more about the Battle of Midway, we highly recommend the video below from the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service:

CSS Chattahoochee: Their Dreams Exploded (New Video)

Our new documentary – CSS Chattahoochee: Their Dreams Exploded – is now available for viewing free on your tv set through our Roku channel or you can stream it right here! We hope that you enjoy it and find it to be of interest.

Apalachicola & Choctawhatchee Rivers at Flood Stage (Jan. 24, 2017)

 

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Water pouring from the Jim Woodruff Dam at Chattahoochee, Florida.

The crest is moving downstream on the Apalachicola, Chipola and Choctawhatchee Rivers as water from this weekend’s storms continues to flow into all three.

(Scroll down the page for more photos!)

Here are river conditions as of 3 p.m. this afternoon. Please note that forecasts can change.

Apalachicola River at Chattahoochee

FLOOD WARNING IN EFFECT

Level:     61.22 feet and falling
Crest:     62.32 (already reached)

The Apalachicola River at Chattahoochee crested at 62.32 feet last night and has started to fall. It did not reach flood stage.

Apalachicola River at Blountstown

FLOOD WARNING IN EFFECT

Level:     19.81 feet.
Flood Level:     17 feet.
Projected Crest:     20.4 feet.

The Apalachicola River at Blountstown is above Flood Stage and will continue to rise before cresting at around 20.4 feet on Wednesday.

Chipola River at Marianna, Florida

Level:     15.32 feet and rising.
Flood Level:     19 feet.
Projected Crest:     17.4 feet.

Projected crest of the Chipola River at Marianna has been raised a second time now but the  river is not expected to reach flood stage.

Chipola River at Altha, Florida

Level:     16.87 feet and rising
Flood Level:     22 feet.
Projected Crest:     19.3 feet on Friday night.

Choctawhatchee River at Newton, Alabama

Level:     16.8 feet and falling.
Flood Level:     19 feet.
Crest:     24.8 feet.
The Choctawhatchee River crested at Newton on Monday (1/23) afternoon after reaching moderate flood levels. By 3 p.m. today, it had fallen 8 feet from its highest point yesterday.

Choctawhatchee River at Geneva, Alabama

FLOOD WARNING IN EFFECT

Level:     24.36 feet and rising.
Flood Stage:     23 feet.
Projected Crest:     24.9 feet.

The Choctawhatchee River at Geneva, Alabama is nearing its projected crest of 24.9 feet . It should crest sometime tonight. The river is above flood stage.

Choctawhatchee River at Pittman, Florida (State Road 2)

FLOOD WARNING IN EFFECT

Level:     24.67 feet and rising.
Flood Stage:     23 feet.
The Choctawhatchee River is above minor flood stage at Pittman in Holmes County, Florida, and is still rising.

Choctawhatchee River at Caryville, Florida

FLOOD WARNING IN EFFECT

Level:     13.55 feet and rising.
Flood Stage:     12 feet.
Projected Crest:     14.9 feet.
The Choctawhatchee River is now above flood stage at the U.S. 90 bridge between Caryville, Florida and Westville, Florida. It will continue to rise tonight and tomorrow before cresting tomorrow night.

Choctawhatchee River at Ebro/Bruce, Florida (State Road 20)

FLOOD WARNING IN EFFECT

Level:     12.61feet and rising.
Flood Stage:     13 feet.
Projected Crest:     16.5 feet.
The Choctawhatchee River is expected to reach Major Flood levels between Ebro and Bruce, Florida by Thursday or Friday. River interests should take all necessary precautions now and all safety recommendations should be followed.

We will provide another update tonight. Here are some photos taken today, yesterday and Sunday.

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Most of the gates were open today (Tuesday) at the Jim Woodruff Dam in Chattahoochee, Florida.
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A closer view of water coming through the Jim Woodruff Dam and into the Apalachicola River from Lake Seminole.
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Looking down the Apalachicola River from the U.S. 90 bridge at Chattahoochee, Florida. The historic bridge in the foreground is the old Victory Bridge, built during the 1920s and named to commemorate the Allied victory in World War I.

 

Oak tree damage along historic "canopy road" segment on Oak Grove Road north of Parramore, Florida.
Oak tree damage along historic “canopy road” segment on Oak Grove Road north of Parramore, Florida.
Electric lines wrapped in fallen oak tree on Oak Grove Road north of Parramore in Jackson County, Florida.
Electric lines wrapped in fallen oak tree on Oak Grove Road north of Parramore in Jackson County, Florida.
Choctawhatchee River over its banks at Cedar Bridge on County Road 83 near Echo, Alabama.
Choctawhatchee River over its banks at Cedar Bridge on County Road 83 near Echo, Alabama. (Photo by Kate Kirkland)
Choctawhatchee River Flooding near Echo, Alabama (Photo by Kate Kirkland).
Choctawhatchee River Flooding near Echo, Alabama (Photo by Kate Kirkland).
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Chipola River beginning to rise at Marianna, Florida. The U.S. 90 bridge is in the background.
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Chipola River starting its rise at Marianna, Florida. Notice the brick pier from the 1914 steel bridge in the background. Part of today’s U.S. 90 bridge is visible at the extreme left of the photo.

 

Exploring the wreck of the paddlewheel boat Albany

The paddlewheel steamer Albany has been a landmark of Florida’s Apalachicola River for 90 years. Two Egg TV obtained special permission to visit her wreck for this story:

A U.S. government snagboat, the Albany operated on the Apalachicola, Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers from around 1928 until 1959. She was tied up and abandoned at Chattahoochee a short time later during a high water event.

Her sister ship, the Montgomery, took over snag duties and continued to operate until 1982.

Many residents of the Chattahoochee and Sneads area remember the novelty of seeing the Albany as she sat high up on the bank of the Apalachicola River. Children played on the decks and explored the empty cabins of the virtually intact steamboat.

Paddlewheel at the stern of the Albany as seen in 1961 after she was abandoned atop the riverbank at Chattahoochee, Florida.
Paddlewheel at the stern of the Albany as seen in 1961 after she was abandoned atop the riverbank at Chattahoochee, Florida.

The Albany slowly deteriorated over time, however, and all that remains today is the hull and lower deck. Even that is rapidly disappearing and in another decade or two nothing will likely be left of the historic vessel but the steel beams of her hull.

She is one of the impressive number of wrecks to be found along the banks of the Apalachicola River at Chattahoochee. The presence of the skeletons of so many paddlewheel steamers and historic wooden barges there have led the stretch of water between the Jim Woodruff Dam and the CSX railroad trestle to be dubbed “Florida’s Inland Graveyard of Ships.”

The wreck of the Albany on private property and is not open to the public. We received special permission and assistance from the owner to photograph the meager remains of the once proud government steamer.

If you enjoyed our story on the Albany, you might also enjoy our visit to the wreck of the steamboat Barbara Hunt:

Remember that you can see all of our programming on your television in high definition by adding our free channel on your Roku device, smart tv or smart phone app.

 

 

The 1836 Attack on Roanoke, Georgia

The most significant Native American victory of the Creek War of 1836 was the Creek Indian attack on Roanoke, Georgia.

Click play to learn more:

The historical marker for Roanoke is located on the west side of GA-39 between Rood Creek Landing Road and Rood Creek Road Connector 2.5 miles south of Florence Marina State Park. Nearby Rood Creek Park is a great place for a picnic lunch.

The Creek War of 1836 was the last major stand by elements of the Creek Nation against forced removal to what is now Oklahoma on the Trail of Tears. Watch for Two Egg TV’s coming documentary on this conflict.

If you enjoyed this story, see more like it by clicking play below to watch Two Egg TV’s live stream:

 

The Rood Dude: Bigfoot of Southwest Georgia

The “Rood Dude” is a Bigfoot or Sasquatch type creature that is said to live along Rood Creek in Southwest Georgia. Two Egg TV spent a little time at Rood Creek recently and has the tale:

If you enjoyed this story, watch more like it on the Two Egg TV Live Stream. Just click play below: