Tag Archives: chattahoochee

Indian mound restoration nears completion in Chattahoochee, Florida

Restoration of the more than 1,000 year old mound is nearing completion.

Restoration of a destroyed prehistoric Indian mound is nearing completion at River Landing Park in Chattahoochee, Florida.

The original mound was built by prehistoric Native Americans more than 1,000 years ago. Unfortunately, it was all but destroyed  when a previous owner of the property used a bulldozer to level it. The site is now owned by the City of Chattahoochee, which has been highly supportive of the effort to restore the earthwork.

A load of earth arrives for use in restoring the mound.

Work on the project began in early June and is expected to be completed by the end of this week if the weather cooperates.

The restoration is a true community project. The idea was conceived by author/historian Dale Cox who has written two books about events that took place at River Landing Park:

Nicolls’ Outpost: A War of 1812 Fort at Chattahoochee, Florida

The Scott Massacre of 1817: A Seminole War Battle in Gadsden County, Florida.

Two Egg TV has documented the restoration of the prehistoric mound and will soon release a documentary on the project.

Proceeds from the books have helped fund the placement of two historical markers at the park. One commemorates a War of 1812 British fort that once stood there and a second tells the story of the Chattahoochee Landing Mound group. A third, which details the Scott Massacre of 1817, is currently on order and will be dedicated on December 2, 2017.

Chattahoochee Main Street approved the project, which is located in the Main Street district, and helped raise funds for its completion.

The project took a massive amount of clay. It was donated by Gadsden County.

The City of Chattahoochee unanimously approved the restoration of the mound, placed a water line to the site and provided other logistical help.

Plans for the mound were prepared for free as a community service by employees of David H. Melvin, Inc. Consulting Engineers of Marianna.

Chattahoochee Councilman L.B. “Bernie” Howell has volunteered scores of hours to assist with the project and has provided enormous help in coordinating the various individuals and entities involved. He is also donating from his own pocket.

L.B. “Bernie” Howell (L) and Sean Neal (R) examine the mound at the completion of the building and compaction phase. The mound is expected to be sodded this week.

Sean Neel and his employees at Neal Contracting, LLC (850-693-0541) have donated many hours of construction work and heavy equipment use while charging only for essentials.

Robert Presnell and Gadsden County donated the clay used in restoring the main bulk of the mound.

Two Egg TV has documented the entire restoration process on video and will soon release a documentary about how the project was accomplished.

Rachael Conrad of Two Egg TV assisted in flagging the area where the reconstructed mound was built.

Original construction of the archaeologically significant Chattahoochee Landing Mound Group is believed to have begun during the Swift Creek cultural era (100-800 A.D.) and continued into the Fort Walton era (900-1500 A.D.).

The complex is thought to have included at least seven mounds, all of which served as the platforms for prehistoric structures. An eighth mound, where burials were located, once stood on the opposite side of the Apalachicola River in Jackson County but was destroyed by erosion.

To learn more about River Landing Park and its prehistoric mounds, please enjoy this free guided tour courtesy of Chattahoochee Main Street, Visit Florida and Two Egg TV:

CSS Chattahoochee: Their Dreams Exploded (New Video)

Our new documentary – CSS Chattahoochee: Their Dreams Exploded – is now available for viewing free on your tv set through our Roku channel or you can stream it right here! We hope that you enjoy it and find it to be of interest.

New trail could mean big things for Liberty, Gadsden & Jackson Counties

Alum Bluff near Bristol is believed by some to be the site of the original Garden of Eden!

A proposed new hiking trail that will link Bristol in Liberty County with Chattahoochee in Gadsden County could bring a significant economic impact to areas both east and west of the Apalachicola River.

Two Egg TV’s Rachael Conrad attended a public hearing on the proposal and provides an in depth look at what it could mean:

The proposed route of the Chattahoochee to Bristol (C2B) Trail includes some of the most remarkable views in Florida along with such rare trees and plants as the Florida Torreya and the Florida Yew. The trail would link to existing trails at Torreya State Park and the Nature Conservancy’s Apalachicola Bluffs and Ravines Preserve.

A crowd of interested citizens attended a public hearing in Chattahoochee on May 22.

The Apalachee Regional Planning Council and Chattahoochee Main Street hosted a public hearing on the proposed trail on May 22nd. Among other key points, those present learned that the trail could be the start of a major system of trails that would link Liberty, Gadsden, Jackson and Bay Counties.

Suggestions were made for refining the proposed route of the trail to avoid flood-prone areas and to  provide better vistas.

A crowd of interested citizens attended a public hearing in Chattahoochee on May 22.

Several hunters asked what impact such a trail might have on hunting season in the area. They were told that any impact would be minimal because most hikers avoid trails during hunting season or make sure to wear orange so they can be seen.

Most of those attending agreed with Ben Chandler of Chattahoochee Main Street, who believes the proposed 20-mile trail will bring low impact tourism to the community.

He feels nature-oriented tourism will generate a good economic impact without damaging the pristine natural resources of the upper Apalachicola River or the peaceful charm of communities along the route.

The proposed trail would connect a series of existing systems such as Chattahoochee’s award-winning trails.

Rett Daniels, Director of Parks in Jackson County, agreed. He said the effort to route the Florida National Scenic Trail from the top of the Chattahoochee to Bristol Trail into Jackson County could provide a solid economic impact for rural communities.

Daniels said that the effort would require strong support from community members and would take several years to complete.

The final decision rests with the U.S. Forest Service, which supervises the Florida National Scenic Trail.

A map showing the proposed trail along with the suggested Jackson County extension of the Florida National Scenic Trail. 

Chattahoochee kicks off 200th anniversary of Scott Massacre of 1817

Chattahoochee and community leaders gather to announce plans for a 200th anniversary commemoration of the Scott Massacre of 1817.
Chattahoochee and community leaders gather to announce plans for a 200th anniversary commemoration of the Scott Massacre of 1817.

Chattahoochee Main Street and the City of Chattahoochee have officially kicked off the 200th anniversary commemoration of the Scott Massacre of 1817.

This battle was the first U.S. defeat of the Seminole Wars and took place at what is now River Landing Park in Chattahoochee. A large force of Red Stick Creek, Seminole, Miccosukee and maroon (Black Seminole) warriors captured a U.S. Army supply boat commanded by Lt. Richard W. Scott of the 7th Infantry Regiment.

The attack ended with the deaths of 34 U.S. soldiers, 6 women and 4 children. A seventh woman, Mrs. Elizabeth Stewart, was taken prisoner and later freed by Brig. Gen. William McIntosh’s U.S. Creek Brigade at the Battle of Econfina.

The kickoff press conference formally announced plans for a commemorative event that will be held at River Landing Park in Chattahoochee on December 1 & 2, 2017:

Plans for the event include living history encampments and demonstrations, memorial services, exhibits, vendors, a marker unveiling, music and entertainment, a chance to meet Florida authors, a military parade and more. The event has been named an official event for the 7th Infantry Living History Association, which portrays the regiment of Lt. Scott and many of his men.

Additional reenactors, vendors, exhibitors and entertainers are needed. If you are interested in the era of the First Seminole War (1817-1818) and would like to participate, please email Chattahoochee Main Street at info@chattahoocheemainstreet.org or call (850) 663-2323/(623) 249-0076.

Here are some additional photos from this week’s press conference:

Dale Cox, author of "The Scott Massacre of 1817," speaks at the press conference.
Dale Cox, author of “The Scott Massacre of 1817,” speaks at the press conference.
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Discussion about the history of River Landing Park and the Scott Massacre of 1817 continued long after the end of the press conference.
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“Lizzie got a gun!” Elizabeth Stewart (portrayed by Two Egg TV’s Rachael Conrad) shows off her weaponry skills.
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Elizabeth Stewart (L), the sole female survivor of the battle, talks with Creek reenactors.
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Living history was on display at the announcement press conference.

To learn more about River Landing Park, site of the Scott Massacre of 1817, please enjoy this video from Chattahoochee Main Street, Visit Florida and Two Egg TV:

          

 

 

Chattahoochee begins restoration of lost Indian mound

Dirt for the restoration next to the last remnant of a destroyed mound at River Landing Park in Chattahoochee, Florida.
Dirt for the restoration next to the last remnant of a destroyed mound at River Landing Park in Chattahoochee, Florida.

The Florida city of Chattahoochee is bringing back a lost part of its culture and landscape.

The first loads of dirt have been brought in to begin the restoration of a prehistoric Native American mound that was destroyed more than 30 years ago.

Restoration of the lost mound was recommended by Dr. Nancy White, PhD, of the University of South Florida in her archaeological survey of the note Chattahoochee Landing Mound Group. The site once included seven prehistoric platform mounds but only three remain today. The restoration project will bring back one of the destroyed mounds to create a fourth.

Work is now underway to restore one of the lost mounds at River Landing Park.
Work is now underway to restore one of the lost mounds at River Landing Park.

The project was organized by Chattahoochee Main Street, the City of Chattahochee and Old Kitchen Media (parent company of Two Egg TV). Design work for the project was donated by David H. Melvin, Inc. Consulting Engineers of Marianna.

The site of the lost mound was relocated and its design was determined from the descriptions of local residents who remember seeing it prior to its destruction. The mound was on private property when it was destroyed, but the site is now on public lands.

The purpose of the project is to restore one of the mounds to its original shape so it can be used as a display and interpretive station where visitors can learn about the mounds, their purpose and their configuration.

A wider view of the restoration site. The mound will be used as an interpretive exhibit.
A wider view of the restoration site. The mound will be used as an interpretive exhibit.

The only surviving part of the original mound is a section held in place by the roots of a tree. That section will be surrounded by a special fabric so future researchers can distinguish the original from the restoration. The rest of the mound will then be restored around it.

Researchers believe that the construction of the mounds began during the Swift Creek era. This culture dates back to the around the 100 A.D. in the area.  Georgia’s  Kolomoki Mounds and Florida’s Crystal River site also date from this time period.

The Chattahoochee Landing Mound Group remained in use through the middle Fort Walton time period before being abandoned somewhere around 1,000-1,200 A.D.

One of the three surviving mounds at River Landing Park in Chattahoochee, Florida.
One of the three surviving mounds at River Landing Park in Chattahoochee, Florida.

The seven mounds are believed to have been platform mounds, meaning they were used as bases or platforms for important homes or ceremonial structures. Associated village areas were located north and south of the mounds, as well as across the river.

The restoration project will take several months to complete and most of its cost is being funded through donations. If you would like to help with a donation, please contact Chattahoochee Main Street at (850) 663-2323 or (623) 249-0076. You can also reach them by email at info@chattahoocheemainstreet.org.

The City of Chattahoochee and Gadsden County are providing labor, dirt and other assistance.

To learn more about River Landing Park, site of the Chattahoochee Landing Mound Group, please enjoy this video from Chattahoochee Main Street, Visit Florida and Two Egg TV:

          

 

 

New Video Tours of River Landing Park in Chattahoochee, Florida

Two Egg TV is pleased to have worked with Chattahoochee Main Street and Visit Florida to produce two new walking tours of historic River Landing Park.

The first of these is the short version, which runs a little over six minutes:

The second is the long version of the tour, which gives you a chance to experience a full walking tour of River Landing Park and its many historic, natural and archaeological sites. It runs around 24 minutes:

Please click here to learn more about the prehistoric Chattahoochee Landing Indian Mounds.

 

Apalachicola & Choctawhatchee Rivers at Flood Stage (Jan. 24, 2017)

 

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Water pouring from the Jim Woodruff Dam at Chattahoochee, Florida.

The crest is moving downstream on the Apalachicola, Chipola and Choctawhatchee Rivers as water from this weekend’s storms continues to flow into all three.

(Scroll down the page for more photos!)

Here are river conditions as of 3 p.m. this afternoon. Please note that forecasts can change.

Apalachicola River at Chattahoochee

FLOOD WARNING IN EFFECT

Level:     61.22 feet and falling
Crest:     62.32 (already reached)

The Apalachicola River at Chattahoochee crested at 62.32 feet last night and has started to fall. It did not reach flood stage.

Apalachicola River at Blountstown

FLOOD WARNING IN EFFECT

Level:     19.81 feet.
Flood Level:     17 feet.
Projected Crest:     20.4 feet.

The Apalachicola River at Blountstown is above Flood Stage and will continue to rise before cresting at around 20.4 feet on Wednesday.

Chipola River at Marianna, Florida

Level:     15.32 feet and rising.
Flood Level:     19 feet.
Projected Crest:     17.4 feet.

Projected crest of the Chipola River at Marianna has been raised a second time now but the  river is not expected to reach flood stage.

Chipola River at Altha, Florida

Level:     16.87 feet and rising
Flood Level:     22 feet.
Projected Crest:     19.3 feet on Friday night.

Choctawhatchee River at Newton, Alabama

Level:     16.8 feet and falling.
Flood Level:     19 feet.
Crest:     24.8 feet.
The Choctawhatchee River crested at Newton on Monday (1/23) afternoon after reaching moderate flood levels. By 3 p.m. today, it had fallen 8 feet from its highest point yesterday.

Choctawhatchee River at Geneva, Alabama

FLOOD WARNING IN EFFECT

Level:     24.36 feet and rising.
Flood Stage:     23 feet.
Projected Crest:     24.9 feet.

The Choctawhatchee River at Geneva, Alabama is nearing its projected crest of 24.9 feet . It should crest sometime tonight. The river is above flood stage.

Choctawhatchee River at Pittman, Florida (State Road 2)

FLOOD WARNING IN EFFECT

Level:     24.67 feet and rising.
Flood Stage:     23 feet.
The Choctawhatchee River is above minor flood stage at Pittman in Holmes County, Florida, and is still rising.

Choctawhatchee River at Caryville, Florida

FLOOD WARNING IN EFFECT

Level:     13.55 feet and rising.
Flood Stage:     12 feet.
Projected Crest:     14.9 feet.
The Choctawhatchee River is now above flood stage at the U.S. 90 bridge between Caryville, Florida and Westville, Florida. It will continue to rise tonight and tomorrow before cresting tomorrow night.

Choctawhatchee River at Ebro/Bruce, Florida (State Road 20)

FLOOD WARNING IN EFFECT

Level:     12.61feet and rising.
Flood Stage:     13 feet.
Projected Crest:     16.5 feet.
The Choctawhatchee River is expected to reach Major Flood levels between Ebro and Bruce, Florida by Thursday or Friday. River interests should take all necessary precautions now and all safety recommendations should be followed.

We will provide another update tonight. Here are some photos taken today, yesterday and Sunday.

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Most of the gates were open today (Tuesday) at the Jim Woodruff Dam in Chattahoochee, Florida.
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A closer view of water coming through the Jim Woodruff Dam and into the Apalachicola River from Lake Seminole.
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Looking down the Apalachicola River from the U.S. 90 bridge at Chattahoochee, Florida. The historic bridge in the foreground is the old Victory Bridge, built during the 1920s and named to commemorate the Allied victory in World War I.

 

Oak tree damage along historic "canopy road" segment on Oak Grove Road north of Parramore, Florida.
Oak tree damage along historic “canopy road” segment on Oak Grove Road north of Parramore, Florida.
Electric lines wrapped in fallen oak tree on Oak Grove Road north of Parramore in Jackson County, Florida.
Electric lines wrapped in fallen oak tree on Oak Grove Road north of Parramore in Jackson County, Florida.
Choctawhatchee River over its banks at Cedar Bridge on County Road 83 near Echo, Alabama.
Choctawhatchee River over its banks at Cedar Bridge on County Road 83 near Echo, Alabama. (Photo by Kate Kirkland)
Choctawhatchee River Flooding near Echo, Alabama (Photo by Kate Kirkland).
Choctawhatchee River Flooding near Echo, Alabama (Photo by Kate Kirkland).
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Chipola River beginning to rise at Marianna, Florida. The U.S. 90 bridge is in the background.
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Chipola River starting its rise at Marianna, Florida. Notice the brick pier from the 1914 steel bridge in the background. Part of today’s U.S. 90 bridge is visible at the extreme left of the photo.

 

Exploring the wreck of the paddlewheel boat Albany

The paddlewheel steamer Albany has been a landmark of Florida’s Apalachicola River for 90 years. Two Egg TV obtained special permission to visit her wreck for this story:

A U.S. government snagboat, the Albany operated on the Apalachicola, Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers from around 1928 until 1959. She was tied up and abandoned at Chattahoochee a short time later during a high water event.

Her sister ship, the Montgomery, took over snag duties and continued to operate until 1982.

Many residents of the Chattahoochee and Sneads area remember the novelty of seeing the Albany as she sat high up on the bank of the Apalachicola River. Children played on the decks and explored the empty cabins of the virtually intact steamboat.

Paddlewheel at the stern of the Albany as seen in 1961 after she was abandoned atop the riverbank at Chattahoochee, Florida.
Paddlewheel at the stern of the Albany as seen in 1961 after she was abandoned atop the riverbank at Chattahoochee, Florida.

The Albany slowly deteriorated over time, however, and all that remains today is the hull and lower deck. Even that is rapidly disappearing and in another decade or two nothing will likely be left of the historic vessel but the steel beams of her hull.

She is one of the impressive number of wrecks to be found along the banks of the Apalachicola River at Chattahoochee. The presence of the skeletons of so many paddlewheel steamers and historic wooden barges there have led the stretch of water between the Jim Woodruff Dam and the CSX railroad trestle to be dubbed “Florida’s Inland Graveyard of Ships.”

The wreck of the Albany on private property and is not open to the public. We received special permission and assistance from the owner to photograph the meager remains of the once proud government steamer.

If you enjoyed our story on the Albany, you might also enjoy our visit to the wreck of the steamboat Barbara Hunt:

Remember that you can see all of our programming on your television in high definition by adding our free channel on your Roku device, smart tv or smart phone app.

 

 

Angus Gholson Nature Park in Chattahoochee, Florida

AngusGholson209x209The Angus Gholson Nature Park in Chattahoochee is home to a remarkable system of hiking trails that take you along the magnificent bluffs and ravines of the upper Apalachicola River.

The park is located just off Morgan Avenue in Chattahoochee and offers picnicking and restrooms in addition to the beautiful trails.

These unique formations are home to some of the rarest trees and plants in the world including the Florida Torreya and Florida Yew:

You might also enjoy this look at a Florida Yew, one of the rarest trees or shrubs in the world:

Remember that you can see all of our programming on your television in high definition by adding our free channel on your Roku device, smart tv or smart phone app.

 

More flood photos from Chattahoochee, Florida

Here are some additional photos of the January 2017 flooding on the Chipola and Apalachicola Rivers as well as Lake Seminole:

Water pours through the historic Jim Woodruff Dam at Chattahoochee. The dam will turn 59 years old this year.
Water pours through the historic Jim Woodruff Dam at Chattahoochee. The dam will turn 59 years old this year.
The Jim Woodruff Dam was completed in 1958 and has dramatically enhanced flood control efforts upstream on the lower Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers.
The Jim Woodruff Dam was completed in 1958 and has dramatically enhanced flood control efforts upstream on the lower Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers.
A closer view of the water pouring through Jim Woodruff Dam at the head of the Apalachicola River.
A closer view of the water pouring through Jim Woodruff Dam at the head of the Apalachicola River.
Another view of the Apalachicola River below Jim Woodruff Dam.
Another view of the Apalachicola River below Jim Woodruff Dam.
A view of River Landing Park from the U.S. 90 bridge shows the floating dock and Great Platform Mound with water flowing over the banks.
A view of River Landing Park from the U.S. 90 bridge shows the floating dock and Great Platform Mound with water flowing over the banks.
Water almost completely surrounds the Great Platform Mound. More than 1,000 years old, this ancient platform mound once provided the base for a Native American home or structure.
Water almost completely surrounds the Great Platform Mound. More than 1,000 years old, this ancient platform mound once provided the base for a Native American home or structure.
A series of small prehistoric Indian mounds can be found along this low ridge at River Landing Park. Normally it is not even noticeable but in minor floods it remains above water level.
A series of small prehistoric Indian mounds can be found along this low ridge at River Landing Park. Normally it is barely noticeable but during minor floods it remains above water level. Whether it is natural or was built by prehistoric Native Americans is not known.

 
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