Tag Archives: Chattahoochee River

CSS Chattahoochee: Their Dreams Exploded (New Video)

Our new documentary – CSS Chattahoochee: Their Dreams Exploded – is now available for viewing free on your tv set through our Roku channel or you can stream it right here! We hope that you enjoy it and find it to be of interest.

Ghost Town of Butler, Florida

Butler and Butler’s Ferry (Butler Landing) as shown on a 1935 map of Jackson County, Florida.

Butler was a thriving Chattahoochee River community during the late 18th and early 19th centuries. It is a ghost town today.

The village was named for the Butler family that once lived there. At its height it was the location of a store, sawmill, gristmill, turpentine still, cotton gin and paddlewheel steamboat landing.

Butler was demolished in 1951, however, after the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers acquired the site during the construction of the Jim Woodruff Dam. Lake Seminole, the 37,500 acre reservoir formed by the dam, was expected to flood community. The waters of the lake did rise and inundate parts of the site, but much of old Butler remains above water.

Click the play button to watch our special tour of the Ghost Town of Butler, Florida:

If you would like to visit the site of Butler, it is located within the Apalachee Wildlife Management Area 6.2 miles north of U.S. 90 at Sneads, Florida. The community surrounded the intersection of River Road (SR-271) and Butler Road.

This map will help you find it:

 

Exploring the wreck of the paddlewheel boat Albany

The paddlewheel steamer Albany has been a landmark of Florida’s Apalachicola River for 90 years. Two Egg TV obtained special permission to visit her wreck for this story:

A U.S. government snagboat, the Albany operated on the Apalachicola, Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers from around 1928 until 1959. She was tied up and abandoned at Chattahoochee a short time later during a high water event.

Her sister ship, the Montgomery, took over snag duties and continued to operate until 1982.

Many residents of the Chattahoochee and Sneads area remember the novelty of seeing the Albany as she sat high up on the bank of the Apalachicola River. Children played on the decks and explored the empty cabins of the virtually intact steamboat.

Paddlewheel at the stern of the Albany as seen in 1961 after she was abandoned atop the riverbank at Chattahoochee, Florida.
Paddlewheel at the stern of the Albany as seen in 1961 after she was abandoned atop the riverbank at Chattahoochee, Florida.

The Albany slowly deteriorated over time, however, and all that remains today is the hull and lower deck. Even that is rapidly disappearing and in another decade or two nothing will likely be left of the historic vessel but the steel beams of her hull.

She is one of the impressive number of wrecks to be found along the banks of the Apalachicola River at Chattahoochee. The presence of the skeletons of so many paddlewheel steamers and historic wooden barges there have led the stretch of water between the Jim Woodruff Dam and the CSX railroad trestle to be dubbed “Florida’s Inland Graveyard of Ships.”

The wreck of the Albany on private property and is not open to the public. We received special permission and assistance from the owner to photograph the meager remains of the once proud government steamer.

If you enjoyed our story on the Albany, you might also enjoy our visit to the wreck of the steamboat Barbara Hunt:

Remember that you can see all of our programming on your television in high definition by adding our free channel on your Roku device, smart tv or smart phone app.

 

 

Overnight River Level Updates – 1/7/2017

Chipola River at Marianna, Florida. The U.S. 90 bridge is in the background.
Chipola River at Marianna, Florida. The U.S. 90 bridge is in the background.
View from the Chipola River Overlook on East Jackson Street in Marianna.
View from the Chipola River Overlook on East Jackson Street in Marianna.

OVERNIGHT UPDATE (1/7/2017)

More rain is falling across the area but it is too soon to know what impact it might have on river levels. The Choctawhatchee had crested at Pittman and Caryville, the Chipola had crested at Marianna and the Apalachicola had crested at Chattahoochee but that was before the overnight rains.

Here are the latest river levels as of midnight:

Chipola River at Marianna, Florida

***Flood Warning in Effect***

18.71 feet and falling.
Flood Stage is 19 feet.
The Chipola River at Marianna has now fallen back below flood stage but remains very high. The river is over its banks throughout Jackson County and into Calhoun County. Some roads and the campground at Florida Caverns State Park are closed. Bellamy Bridge Heritage Trail is closed.

Chipola River near Altha, Florida

***Flood Warning in Effect***

22.03 feet and rising.
Flood Stage is 22 feet,
The Chipola River at Altha continues to rise and is now above flood stage. The projected crest of 22.4 feet is expected to take place sometime on Saturday.

Apalachicola River at Chattahoochee, Florida

River level at Chattahochee is 60.57 feet and falling.
Flood stage is 66 feet.
The Apalachicola River at Chattahoochee crested on Thursday and has now fallen by nearly three feet. It remains over its banks in the River Landing area.

Apalachicola River at Blountstown, Florida

***Flood Warning in Effect***
River level at Blountstown is 20.52 feet and nearing its crest.
Flood stage is 17 feet.
A flood warning is in effect at Blounstown, where the Apalachicola River is above flood stage and is expected to crest tonight at 20.6 feet.

Choctawhatchee River at Pittman, Florida (Highway 2)

***Flood Warning in Effect***
River level at Pittman is 24.1 feet and falling.
Flood stage is 23 feet.
The Choctawhatchee River at Pittman (State Road 2) crested at 26 feet and is now falling. It remains above flood stage, however, and all safety measures should be followed.

Choctawhatchee River at Caryville, Florida (US 90)

***Flood Warning in Effect***
River level at Caryville is 14.4 feet and is falling.
Flood stage is 12 feet.
The Choctawhatchee River at Caryville crested 24 hours ago and is falling. Flood conditions continue at this time, however, and all safety precautions should be followed.

Choctawhatchee River near Bruce/Ebro Florida (State Road 20)

***Flood Warning in Effect***
River level is 17.64 feet and nearing its crest.
Flood stage is 13 feet.
The Choctawhatchee River between Ebro and Bruce is more than 4.5 feet above flood stage at midnight was still rising. A MAJOR flood is now underway. Those with homes, fishing camps and other interests along the  The river is nearing its crest and should begin to fall by tomorrow morning. Flood conditions will continue for a number of days from near the Choctawhachee’s confluence with Holmes Creek to the Gulf of Mexico. Please follow all instructions from Emergency Management Offices and other emergency workers. DO NOT DRIVE into flooded areas.

Flood Photos from Chattahoochee, Marianna, Bellamy Bridge & Lake Seminole

Here are some photos of the January flood of 2017 from Lake Seminole, Marianna, Bellamy Bridge and Chattahoochee:

The Apalachicola River is running high as water pours through the Jim Woodruff Dam at Chattahoochee.
The Apalachicola River is running high as water pours through the Jim Woodruff Dam at Chattahoochee.
Flood waters nearly surround the Great Platform Mound, one of seven prehistoric Indian mounds at River Landing Park in Chattahoochee.
Flood waters nearly surround the Great Platform Mound, one of seven prehistoric Indian mounds at River Landing Park in Chattahoochee.
Stage area at River Landing Park in Chattahoochee is surrounded by water.
Stage area at River Landing Park in Chattahoochee is surrounded by water.
Anglers doing some "fast water" fishing off River Landing Park at Chattahoochee. The U.S. 90 bridge is in the background.
Anglers doing some “fast water” fishing off River Landing Park at Chattahoochee. The U.S. 90 bridge is in the background.
The Apalachicola River is over its banks at Chattahoochee and can clearly be seen in this photo taken from the eastern approaches of the U.S. 90 bridge.
The Apalachicola River is over its banks at Chattahoochee and can clearly be seen in this photo taken from the eastern approaches of the U.S. 90 bridge.
Bellamy Bridge Heritage Trail on the Chipola River north of Marianna is completely flooded. This point is 1/2 mile from the Chipola River.
Bellamy Bridge Heritage Trail on the Chipola River north of Marianna is completely flooded. This point is 1/2 mile from the Chipola River.
Chipola River at Bellamy Bridge.
Chipola River at Bellamy Bridge.
Water up to the trailhead sign at the Bellamy Bridge Heritage Trail on the Chipola River north of Marianna.
Water up to the trailhead sign at the Bellamy Bridge Heritage Trail on the Chipola River north of Marianna.
The Chipola out of its banks and flooding part of Citizens Lodge Park on Caverns Road in Marianna.
The Chipola out of its banks and flooding part of Citizens Lodge Park on Caverns Road in Marianna.
Chipola River at flood stage as seen from Yancy Bridge on Caverns Road in Marianna.
Chipola River at flood stage as seen from Yancy Bridge on Caverns Road in Marianna.
Water fills the Chipola River floodplain at Yancy Bridge on Caverns Road in Marianna.
Water fills the Chipola River floodplain at Yancy Bridge on Caverns Road in Marianna.
Flooded boat ramp and docks at Parramore Landing Park on Lake Seminole in Jackson County, Florida.
Flooded boat ramp and docks at Parramore Landing Park on Lake Seminole in Jackson County, Florida.
Picnic area flooding at Parramore Landing Park.
Picnic area flooding at Parramore Landing Park.
Picnic area flooding at Parramore Landing Park on Lake Seminole in Jackson County, Florida.
Picnic area flooding at Parramore Landing Park on Lake Seminole in Jackson County, Florida.
Water over the boat ramp and fishing dock at Buena Vista Landing on Lake Seminole in Jackson County, Florida.
Water over the boat ramp and fishing dock at Buena Vista Landing on Lake Seminole in Jackson County, Florida.
Water overflowing the boat ramp at Neal's Landing Park on the Chattahoochee River arm of Lake Seminole.
Water overflowing the boat ramp at Neal’s Landing Park on the Chattahoochee River arm of Lake Seminole. The Chattahoochee River is visible in the background.
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High water at Neal’s Landing Park.
View from the Chipola River Overlook on East Jackson Street in Marianna.
Chipola River at Marianna, Florida.
Chipola River at Marianna, Florida. The U.S. 90 bridge is in the background.
Chipola River at Marianna, Florida. The U.S. 90 bridge is in the background.
Chipola River at Marianna, taken earlier today.
Chipola River Overlook at Marianna, Florida.

The Pensacola – St. Augustine Road: A remarkable journey down Highway 2 in the Florida Panhandle

The Pensacola – St. Augustine Road was the first road connecting the two historic capitals of Florida during the Colonial era. In this special feature, Two Egg TV’s Rachael Conrad searches for traces of the historic trail and finds much more than expected!

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Fort Gaines, GA turns 200!

A restored blockhouse stands atop the bluff where the original Fort Gaines was built 200 years ago.
A restored blockhouse stands atop the bluff where the original Fort Gaines was built 200 years ago.

Fort Gaines, the historic Georgia city overlooking the Chattahoochee River, is now 200 years old. (Be sure to see the video at the bottom of this page!)

Located on the sites of American Indian settlements dating back thousands of years, the city takes its name from a frontier military post established by U.S. troops on April 2, 1816. The high bluff was then at the very edge of the country’s frontier and settlers trickling into lands ceded from the Creek Nation by the Treaty of Fort Jackson were facing resistance from Creek and Seminole warriors.

Site of Fort Gaines.
Site of Fort Gaines.

To counter reports of growing anger among the American Indians living on the Chattahoochee, Flint and Apalachicola Rivers, Maj. Gen. Edmund Pendleton Gaines accompanied a battalion from the 4th U.S. Infantry down the Chattahoochee from Fort Mitchell, Alabama. The troops were under the immediate command of Lt. Col. Duncan Lamont Clinch and arrived at the present site of Fort Gaines 200 years ago today.

Maj. Gen. Edmund P. Gaines
Maj. Gen. Edmund P. Gaines

The general described his arrival at the site in a letter to Major General Andrew Jackson:

I descended the Chattahoochee with a battalion of the 4th from Fort Mitchell to the mouth of Summochechoba Creek where I left it in the command of Lt. Col. Clinch on the 7th inst. The Lt. Colonel has commenced a small work, consisting of a square picketing and two block houses, to be defended by one company. The site is strong, handsome and apparently healthy. It is upon the left bank of the river on a hill or bluff 133 feet, nearly perpendicular from the edge of the water. (Maj. Gen. Edmund P. Gaines to Maj. Gen. Andrew Jackson, April 18, 1816)

Lt. Col. Duncan L. Clinch 4th U.S. Infantry
Lt. Col. Duncan L. Clinch
4th U.S. Infantry

General Gaines remained at his namesake fort only four days, although he returned several more times over the next two years. Behind he left Lt. Col. Clinch and his men to complete work on the new stockade.

Maj. John M. Davis, who visited Fort Gaines during the fall of that year, described it in a report filed the following spring:

Statue of Creek chief Otis Mico at Frontier Village in Fort Gaines, GA.
Statue of Creek chief Otis Mico at Frontier Village in Fort Gaines, GA.

Fort Gaines is a commanding situation on the East bank of the Chatahoochie river, about the 32d Degree of North latitude. – It is a small stockade work with two Block houses at diagonal angles, where there is at present a small detachment of the 4th Regiment of Infantry. This place is sufficient for the reception of one company – is considered a healthy situation, but somewhat difficult to get supplies of provisions &c. As every article that is got there has to be waggoned from Georgia, a distance of one hundred miles through a wilderness country, to the Chatahoochie river, where the Federal road crosses – thence it is taken by water to Fort Gaines. (Maj. John M. Davis, Inspection Report, April 30, 1817)

The original fort was occupied by the army until 1821 and played an important role as a supply depot during the First Seminole War of 1817-1818. The site is marked today by a one-third scale replica of one of the log blockhouses.

Frontier Village Fort Gaines, GA
Frontier Village
Fort Gaines, GA

Fort Gaines will officially celebrate its 200th anniversary on the weekend of April 8-9, 2016, with “A Skirmish at Fort Gaines.” The event will take place at the Frontier Village at 100 Bluff Street (adjacent to the original fort site) and will be underway from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Eastern time on both Saturday and Sunday.

There will be demonstrators, reenactors, vendors, BBQ, live music and even a daily reenactment of a battle between early settlers and Creek warriors. The reenactment will start each day at 2 p.m. Eastern and has an admission fee of $5 for Adults (free for kids under 10).

Please click here to learn more about Skirmish at Fort Gaines.

Enjoy some video scenes of the Fort Gaines blockhouse by clicking play below: