Tag Archives: apalachicola

Riding the Apalachicola River with Capt. Gill

Join us for a journey through the estuary of the Apalachicola River with Capt. Gill Autrey:

You can learn more about Capt. Gill’s River Cruises by visiting  www.captgill.com.

Here are some additional photos from our cruise on the lower Apalachicola River:

The waterfront of historic Apalachicola, Florida.
The Apalachicola River not far upstream from its mouth.
Bloody Bluff Landing was once called “Dueling Bluff.” U.S. forces occupied the bluff as a command post during the attack on the Fort at Prospect Bluff (“Negro Fort”).
Prospect Bluff, site of the British Post (later called the “Negro Fort) and Fort Gadsden, was the scene of the deadliest cannon shot in American history.
An osprey nest in the estuary of the Apalachicola River, Florida.
The beautiful marshes of the Apalachicola River estuary.

If you would like to see more about historic Apalachicola, Florida, click below for a tour of the city and its history:

Apalachicola & Choctawhatchee Rivers at Flood Stage (Jan. 24, 2017)

 

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Water pouring from the Jim Woodruff Dam at Chattahoochee, Florida.

The crest is moving downstream on the Apalachicola, Chipola and Choctawhatchee Rivers as water from this weekend’s storms continues to flow into all three.

(Scroll down the page for more photos!)

Here are river conditions as of 3 p.m. this afternoon. Please note that forecasts can change.

Apalachicola River at Chattahoochee

FLOOD WARNING IN EFFECT

Level:     61.22 feet and falling
Crest:     62.32 (already reached)

The Apalachicola River at Chattahoochee crested at 62.32 feet last night and has started to fall. It did not reach flood stage.

Apalachicola River at Blountstown

FLOOD WARNING IN EFFECT

Level:     19.81 feet.
Flood Level:     17 feet.
Projected Crest:     20.4 feet.

The Apalachicola River at Blountstown is above Flood Stage and will continue to rise before cresting at around 20.4 feet on Wednesday.

Chipola River at Marianna, Florida

Level:     15.32 feet and rising.
Flood Level:     19 feet.
Projected Crest:     17.4 feet.

Projected crest of the Chipola River at Marianna has been raised a second time now but the  river is not expected to reach flood stage.

Chipola River at Altha, Florida

Level:     16.87 feet and rising
Flood Level:     22 feet.
Projected Crest:     19.3 feet on Friday night.

Choctawhatchee River at Newton, Alabama

Level:     16.8 feet and falling.
Flood Level:     19 feet.
Crest:     24.8 feet.
The Choctawhatchee River crested at Newton on Monday (1/23) afternoon after reaching moderate flood levels. By 3 p.m. today, it had fallen 8 feet from its highest point yesterday.

Choctawhatchee River at Geneva, Alabama

FLOOD WARNING IN EFFECT

Level:     24.36 feet and rising.
Flood Stage:     23 feet.
Projected Crest:     24.9 feet.

The Choctawhatchee River at Geneva, Alabama is nearing its projected crest of 24.9 feet . It should crest sometime tonight. The river is above flood stage.

Choctawhatchee River at Pittman, Florida (State Road 2)

FLOOD WARNING IN EFFECT

Level:     24.67 feet and rising.
Flood Stage:     23 feet.
The Choctawhatchee River is above minor flood stage at Pittman in Holmes County, Florida, and is still rising.

Choctawhatchee River at Caryville, Florida

FLOOD WARNING IN EFFECT

Level:     13.55 feet and rising.
Flood Stage:     12 feet.
Projected Crest:     14.9 feet.
The Choctawhatchee River is now above flood stage at the U.S. 90 bridge between Caryville, Florida and Westville, Florida. It will continue to rise tonight and tomorrow before cresting tomorrow night.

Choctawhatchee River at Ebro/Bruce, Florida (State Road 20)

FLOOD WARNING IN EFFECT

Level:     12.61feet and rising.
Flood Stage:     13 feet.
Projected Crest:     16.5 feet.
The Choctawhatchee River is expected to reach Major Flood levels between Ebro and Bruce, Florida by Thursday or Friday. River interests should take all necessary precautions now and all safety recommendations should be followed.

We will provide another update tonight. Here are some photos taken today, yesterday and Sunday.

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Most of the gates were open today (Tuesday) at the Jim Woodruff Dam in Chattahoochee, Florida.
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A closer view of water coming through the Jim Woodruff Dam and into the Apalachicola River from Lake Seminole.
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Looking down the Apalachicola River from the U.S. 90 bridge at Chattahoochee, Florida. The historic bridge in the foreground is the old Victory Bridge, built during the 1920s and named to commemorate the Allied victory in World War I.

 

Oak tree damage along historic "canopy road" segment on Oak Grove Road north of Parramore, Florida.
Oak tree damage along historic “canopy road” segment on Oak Grove Road north of Parramore, Florida.
Electric lines wrapped in fallen oak tree on Oak Grove Road north of Parramore in Jackson County, Florida.
Electric lines wrapped in fallen oak tree on Oak Grove Road north of Parramore in Jackson County, Florida.
Choctawhatchee River over its banks at Cedar Bridge on County Road 83 near Echo, Alabama.
Choctawhatchee River over its banks at Cedar Bridge on County Road 83 near Echo, Alabama. (Photo by Kate Kirkland)
Choctawhatchee River Flooding near Echo, Alabama (Photo by Kate Kirkland).
Choctawhatchee River Flooding near Echo, Alabama (Photo by Kate Kirkland).
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Chipola River beginning to rise at Marianna, Florida. The U.S. 90 bridge is in the background.
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Chipola River starting its rise at Marianna, Florida. Notice the brick pier from the 1914 steel bridge in the background. Part of today’s U.S. 90 bridge is visible at the extreme left of the photo.

 

Exploring the wreck of the paddlewheel boat Albany

The paddlewheel steamer Albany has been a landmark of Florida’s Apalachicola River for 90 years. Two Egg TV obtained special permission to visit her wreck for this story:

A U.S. government snagboat, the Albany operated on the Apalachicola, Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers from around 1928 until 1959. She was tied up and abandoned at Chattahoochee a short time later during a high water event.

Her sister ship, the Montgomery, took over snag duties and continued to operate until 1982.

Many residents of the Chattahoochee and Sneads area remember the novelty of seeing the Albany as she sat high up on the bank of the Apalachicola River. Children played on the decks and explored the empty cabins of the virtually intact steamboat.

Paddlewheel at the stern of the Albany as seen in 1961 after she was abandoned atop the riverbank at Chattahoochee, Florida.
Paddlewheel at the stern of the Albany as seen in 1961 after she was abandoned atop the riverbank at Chattahoochee, Florida.

The Albany slowly deteriorated over time, however, and all that remains today is the hull and lower deck. Even that is rapidly disappearing and in another decade or two nothing will likely be left of the historic vessel but the steel beams of her hull.

She is one of the impressive number of wrecks to be found along the banks of the Apalachicola River at Chattahoochee. The presence of the skeletons of so many paddlewheel steamers and historic wooden barges there have led the stretch of water between the Jim Woodruff Dam and the CSX railroad trestle to be dubbed “Florida’s Inland Graveyard of Ships.”

The wreck of the Albany on private property and is not open to the public. We received special permission and assistance from the owner to photograph the meager remains of the once proud government steamer.

If you enjoyed our story on the Albany, you might also enjoy our visit to the wreck of the steamboat Barbara Hunt:

Remember that you can see all of our programming on your television in high definition by adding our free channel on your Roku device, smart tv or smart phone app.

 

 

Excerpt: The Fort at Prospect Bluff documentary

The Fort at Prospect Bluff (or “Negro Fort”) was built by the British in 1814 and destroyed by U.S. forces in 1816. It was the scene of the deadliest cannon shot in American history, a 9-pound cannonball that blew up the gunpowder magazine and killed 270 of the 320 men, women and children within its walls.

Two Egg TV is producing a full-length documentary on the history of the fort. Here is a first preview:

Please click here to read more about the fort from www.exploresouthernhistory.com.

John Gorrie statue threatened with removal

Statue of Dr. John Gorrie at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. (Library of Congress)
Statue of Dr. John Gorrie at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C.
(Library of Congress)

A South Florida legislator wants to see the statue of Dr. John Gorrie pulled down and removed from the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C.

Dr. Gorrie, a 19th century resident of Apalachicola, was the inventor of the ice machine and artificial refrigeration. His work and theories paved the way for the development of air conditioning, modern food preservation and the use of temperature control to save the lives of patients with malaria and other fevers. Without the discoveries made possible by this great scientist, modern Florida would never have developed.

The famed scientist, who also lived briefly near present-day Sneads, is one of two Floridians honored at Statuary Hall in the nation’s capital. The other is Gen. Edmund Kirby Smith, a St. Augustine native, who served in the U.S. and Confederate armies and was wounded in the service of both.

A move has been underway in the Florida to topple Smith’s statue from its place in Statuary Hall due to his Confederate service (even though Confederate servicemen are considered U.S. veterans under federal law). The effort has now expanded to include Dr. Gorrie, who never served the Confederacy, as well.

Dr. John Gorrie was a noted Florida scientist, physician and inventor.
Dr. John Gorrie was a noted Florida scientist, physician and inventor.

Rep. Jose Felix Diaz (GOP, Miami) has sponsored House Bill 141 that calls for dragging Smith’s statue from the U.S. Capitol. His bill has now been amended to call for the toppling of Dr. Gorrie’s statue as well.

The proposal has been approved by an 18-1 vote of the House Appropriations Committee and is on its way for a vote in the full house, perhaps as soon as tomorrow (Monday, February 8).

Remarkably, the amendment calling for the tearing down of Dr. Gorrie’s statue comes just months after he was named in 2015 to the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame. The great scientist’s legacy is also remembered in Apalachicola at the John Gorrie Museum State Park. He is buried across the street from the museum. (See video of some of the Gorrie-related sites in Apalachicola at the bottom of this post).

Apalachicola and Sneads are small cities in Northwest Florida with virtually no power in the Florida Legislature, which appears to be experiencing an unprecedented wave of political correctness. Their connection to Dr. Gorrie, however, provides an opportunity for young people to learn about a great scientist and how the work of one local man changed the world.

An effort to remove the statue of a scientist and school from the U.S. Capitol is especially astounding given the obvious need in Florida to inspire students to take greater interest in math and science. The Miami representative and his cohorts should be ashamed of themselves.

Rep. Brad Drake of Walton County, who represents the Sneads area, has announced that he will oppose House Bill 141. He is due our gratitude for taking a principal stand in the face of a powerful movement.

If you live in Florida, please join me in encouraging your local state representative to vote NO on House Bill 141. You can locate the name and contact information of your representative by visiting Florida House of Representatives.

Here is a short video of some of the places connected to Dr. Gorrie in historic Apalachicola, Florida: