Category Archives: historic sites

Cowpen Pond Cemetery in Dellwood, Florida

Two Egg TV takes you on a special visit to Cowpen Pond Cemetery near the community of Dellwood in the Florida Panhandle. It is the burial place of scores of Florida pioneers, including descendants of American frontiersman Daniel Boone.

Have you watched Two Egg TV LIVE? Just click below to check it out for yourself!

Fort Gaines, GA turns 200!

A restored blockhouse stands atop the bluff where the original Fort Gaines was built 200 years ago.
A restored blockhouse stands atop the bluff where the original Fort Gaines was built 200 years ago.

Fort Gaines, the historic Georgia city overlooking the Chattahoochee River, is now 200 years old. (Be sure to see the video at the bottom of this page!)

Located on the sites of American Indian settlements dating back thousands of years, the city takes its name from a frontier military post established by U.S. troops on April 2, 1816. The high bluff was then at the very edge of the country’s frontier and settlers trickling into lands ceded from the Creek Nation by the Treaty of Fort Jackson were facing resistance from Creek and Seminole warriors.

Site of Fort Gaines.
Site of Fort Gaines.

To counter reports of growing anger among the American Indians living on the Chattahoochee, Flint and Apalachicola Rivers, Maj. Gen. Edmund Pendleton Gaines accompanied a battalion from the 4th U.S. Infantry down the Chattahoochee from Fort Mitchell, Alabama. The troops were under the immediate command of Lt. Col. Duncan Lamont Clinch and arrived at the present site of Fort Gaines 200 years ago today.

Maj. Gen. Edmund P. Gaines
Maj. Gen. Edmund P. Gaines

The general described his arrival at the site in a letter to Major General Andrew Jackson:

I descended the Chattahoochee with a battalion of the 4th from Fort Mitchell to the mouth of Summochechoba Creek where I left it in the command of Lt. Col. Clinch on the 7th inst. The Lt. Colonel has commenced a small work, consisting of a square picketing and two block houses, to be defended by one company. The site is strong, handsome and apparently healthy. It is upon the left bank of the river on a hill or bluff 133 feet, nearly perpendicular from the edge of the water. (Maj. Gen. Edmund P. Gaines to Maj. Gen. Andrew Jackson, April 18, 1816)

Lt. Col. Duncan L. Clinch 4th U.S. Infantry
Lt. Col. Duncan L. Clinch
4th U.S. Infantry

General Gaines remained at his namesake fort only four days, although he returned several more times over the next two years. Behind he left Lt. Col. Clinch and his men to complete work on the new stockade.

Maj. John M. Davis, who visited Fort Gaines during the fall of that year, described it in a report filed the following spring:

Statue of Creek chief Otis Mico at Frontier Village in Fort Gaines, GA.
Statue of Creek chief Otis Mico at Frontier Village in Fort Gaines, GA.

Fort Gaines is a commanding situation on the East bank of the Chatahoochie river, about the 32d Degree of North latitude. – It is a small stockade work with two Block houses at diagonal angles, where there is at present a small detachment of the 4th Regiment of Infantry. This place is sufficient for the reception of one company – is considered a healthy situation, but somewhat difficult to get supplies of provisions &c. As every article that is got there has to be waggoned from Georgia, a distance of one hundred miles through a wilderness country, to the Chatahoochie river, where the Federal road crosses – thence it is taken by water to Fort Gaines. (Maj. John M. Davis, Inspection Report, April 30, 1817)

The original fort was occupied by the army until 1821 and played an important role as a supply depot during the First Seminole War of 1817-1818. The site is marked today by a one-third scale replica of one of the log blockhouses.

Frontier Village Fort Gaines, GA
Frontier Village
Fort Gaines, GA

Fort Gaines will officially celebrate its 200th anniversary on the weekend of April 8-9, 2016, with “A Skirmish at Fort Gaines.” The event will take place at the Frontier Village at 100 Bluff Street (adjacent to the original fort site) and will be underway from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Eastern time on both Saturday and Sunday.

There will be demonstrators, reenactors, vendors, BBQ, live music and even a daily reenactment of a battle between early settlers and Creek warriors. The reenactment will start each day at 2 p.m. Eastern and has an admission fee of $5 for Adults (free for kids under 10).

Please click here to learn more about Skirmish at Fort Gaines.

Enjoy some video scenes of the Fort Gaines blockhouse by clicking play below:

Great Oaks Mansion to become public?

Has a group of local preservationists succeeded in their effort to save one of Florida last remaining antebellum mansions? Here’s the full story from Two Egg TV:

Be sure to visit our main page at http://twoegg.tv for more great stories from the American Southeast!

 

Great Oaks mansion in historic Greenwood, Florida.
Great Oaks mansion in historic Greenwood, Florida.

Boll Weevil Monument – Enterprise, Alabama

The Boll Weevil Monument is one of the few monuments in the world erected to honor an insect! Rachael Conrad has the story of this fascinating memorial in Enterprise, Alabama:

To see other great stories from around the Southeast, be sure to visit our main page at www.twoegg.tv.

 

 

Historic grist mill in Jackson County, Florida

The historic Sexton Mill (also called the Kent Mill or Dilmore Mill) is located near Alford in the picturesque lakes country of Jackson County, Florida.  Built in 1884, it is still operational and is a unique reminder of times gone by.

With this report we also welcome Robert Daffin, formerly of Chipola College TV’s Southern Heritage show to Two Egg TV!

To see other great historic sites and “off the beaten path” places, visit our main page at www.twoegg.tv.

Chipley, FL: Boyhood home of the real “Atticus Finch”

Atticus Finch Monument in Monroeville, Alabama (The George F. Landegger Collection of Alabama Photographs in Carol M. Highsmith's America, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division)
Atticus Finch Monument in Monroeville, Alabama
(The George F. Landegger Collection of Alabama Photographs in Carol M. Highsmith’s America, Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division).

The death of Harper Lee on Friday (2/19/2016) took lovers of Southern literature by surprise.

She is best remembered, of course, for her monumental novel To Kill a Mockingbird. It is a story about coming of age in a small Southern town and is filled with memorable characters, good and bad.

Carr Road near the site of the boyhood home of Amasa Coleman Lee, the real Atticus Finch.
Carr Road near the site of the boyhood home of Amasa Coleman Lee, the real Atticus Finch.

Principal among these is a small town lawyer named Atticus Finch, who teaches his young daughter about the humanity of all people. The character is based on Lee’s own father, a small town lawyer named Amasa Lee.

The similarity of the real name Amasa to the fictional name Atticus is obvious.

Gregory Peck received an Academy Award for his portrayal of Atticus Finch in the movie based on Lee’s novel. A monument to the fictional lawyer can be seen on the grounds of the historic old courthouse in Monroeville, Alabama, the town that Lee called home for most of her life. (Note: See Peck as Atticus Finch in the clip from To Kill a Mockingbird at the bottom of this article).

Site of the boyhood home of Amasa Coleman Lee, the real Atticus Finch, near Chipley, Florida.
Site of the boyhood home of Amasa Coleman Lee, the real Atticus Finch, near Chipley, Florida.

It is a little known fact, however, that Amasa Lee – the “real” Atticus Finch – spent part of his boyhood on a farm just north of Chipley in the Florida Panhandle.

His parents, Cader A. Lee and Eufrasa Windam Lee, moved from Alabama to Florida in around 1893. Amasa was then thirteen years old.

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Swamps surround the site of the boyhood home of Amasa Coleman Lee, the real Atticus FInch.

The family settled on a small farm just north of Chipley but then across the line in neighboring Holmes County. Realignment of county boundaries, however, left the site within the limits of today’s Washington County.

Cader Lee was a homesteader and moved to Florida to take advantage of the opportunity to claim free land by establishing a home and farm on previously unclaimed lands. The site he picked is low and swampy, with Holmes Creek about one-half mile away to the west and Alligator Creek a short distance in the opposite direction.

The elder Mr. Lee obtained title to his property on March 8, 1894 when Homestead Certificate Number 10880 was approved by the land office in Gainesville. The teenage Amasa lived and worked on the 160-acre farm until he reached adulthood.

Graves of Cader and Eufrasa Lee, grandparents of novelist Harper Lee, at Marvin Chapel Cemetery in Graceville, Florida.
Graves of Cader and Eufrasa Lee, grandparents of novelist Harper Lee, at Marvin Chapel Cemetery in Graceville, Florida.

Cader and Eufrasa Lee eventually moved to Graceville in neighboring Jackson County, where their graves can be seen today at Marvin Chapel Cemetery. Amasa, however, returned to Alabama where he studied law and married Frances Cunningham. His youngest daughter – Nelle Harper Lee – was born on April 28, 1926.

The farm near Chipley eventually passed on to other owners and is marked by groves of planted pines along Carr Road today. No other trace remains of the boyhood home of Amasa Coleman Lee, the real Atticus Finch.

Watch Gregory Peck portray Atticus Finch in this clip from To Kill a Mockingbird: