Chattahoochee begins restoration of lost Indian mound

Dirt for the restoration next to the last remnant of a destroyed mound at River Landing Park in Chattahoochee, Florida.
Dirt for the restoration next to the last remnant of a destroyed mound at River Landing Park in Chattahoochee, Florida.

The Florida city of Chattahoochee is bringing back a lost part of its culture and landscape.

The first loads of dirt have been brought in to begin the restoration of a prehistoric Native American mound that was destroyed more than 30 years ago.

Restoration of the lost mound was recommended by Dr. Nancy White, PhD, of the University of South Florida in her archaeological survey of the note Chattahoochee Landing Mound Group. The site once included seven prehistoric platform mounds but only three remain today. The restoration project will bring back one of the destroyed mounds to create a fourth.

Work is now underway to restore one of the lost mounds at River Landing Park.
Work is now underway to restore one of the lost mounds at River Landing Park.

The project was organized by Chattahoochee Main Street, the City of Chattahochee and Old Kitchen Media (parent company of Two Egg TV). Design work for the project was donated by David H. Melvin, Inc. Consulting Engineers of Marianna.

The site of the lost mound was relocated and its design was determined from the descriptions of local residents who remember seeing it prior to its destruction. The mound was on private property when it was destroyed, but the site is now on public lands.

The purpose of the project is to restore one of the mounds to its original shape so it can be used as a display and interpretive station where visitors can learn about the mounds, their purpose and their configuration.

A wider view of the restoration site. The mound will be used as an interpretive exhibit.
A wider view of the restoration site. The mound will be used as an interpretive exhibit.

The only surviving part of the original mound is a section held in place by the roots of a tree. That section will be surrounded by a special fabric so future researchers can distinguish the original from the restoration. The rest of the mound will then be restored around it.

Researchers believe that the construction of the mounds began during the Swift Creek era. This culture dates back to the around the 100 A.D. in the area.  Georgia’s  Kolomoki Mounds and Florida’s Crystal River site also date from this time period.

The Chattahoochee Landing Mound Group remained in use through the middle Fort Walton time period before being abandoned somewhere around 1,000-1,200 A.D.

One of the three surviving mounds at River Landing Park in Chattahoochee, Florida.
One of the three surviving mounds at River Landing Park in Chattahoochee, Florida.

The seven mounds are believed to have been platform mounds, meaning they were used as bases or platforms for important homes or ceremonial structures. Associated village areas were located north and south of the mounds, as well as across the river.

The restoration project will take several months to complete and most of its cost is being funded through donations. If you would like to help with a donation, please contact Chattahoochee Main Street at (850) 663-2323 or (623) 249-0076. You can also reach them by email at info@chattahoocheemainstreet.org.

The City of Chattahoochee and Gadsden County are providing labor, dirt and other assistance.

To learn more about River Landing Park, site of the Chattahoochee Landing Mound Group, please enjoy this video from Chattahoochee Main Street, Visit Florida and Two Egg TV:

          

 

 

WTVY to feature Two Egg in May!

WTVY journalist Kimberly Hyde (R) talks with Robert Long, Sr. (C) and Dale Cox (L).
WTVY journalist Kimberly Hyde (R) talks with Robert Long, Sr. (C) and Dale Cox (L).

TwoEgg.TV had fun today hosting Kimberly Hyde, one of our friends from WTVY-TV in Dothan, Alabama. She is preparing a feature to be aired on WTVY in May.

Kimberly is working on a series of stories that WTVY will air over several days beginning May 9th. Her stories will focus on the good things about life in small American towns and Two Egg is one of several communities that she is visiting. One of our other favorite communities – Screamer, Alabama – will also be featured!

TwoEgg.TV General Manager Rachael Conrad coordinated a visit for the multi-media journalist to the Long Cane Syrup operation on Highway 69 in Two Egg. Robert Long, Sr. spoke with her about the growing operation that is a much-loved part of the community.

This year’s Robert E. Long Cane Syrup Day  will take place on the morning of Saturday, December 2nd.

The story will also feature author and historian Dale Cox who was interviewed about the unique history of Two Egg and what he loves about being from the area.

Here are some photos from today’s visit!

Robert Long, Sr. (L) and Dale Cox (R) discuss the heritage of syrup making in the Two Egg area.
Robert Long, Sr. (L) and Dale Cox (R) discuss the heritage of syrup making in the Two Egg area.
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Robert Long, Sr. discusses his family’s 1947 Thompson Foundry cane grinder. It was manufactured in Thomasville, Georgia.
WTVY's Kimberly Hyde interviews Dale Cox about the history of Two Egg, Florida.
WTVY’s Kimberly Hyde interviews Dale Cox about the history of Two Egg, Florida.

If you would like a behind the scenes look at the annual Robert E. Long Cane Syrup Day, enjoy this video essay from Two Egg TV’s Rachael Conrad:

Gopher Tortoise Day in Two Egg, Florida

gopherHappy Gopher Tortoise Day!

The Gopher Tortoise Council has officially adopted April 10th as Gopher Tortoise Day in Florida. It is a day set aside to raise public awareness about these incredible tortoises.

Two Egg TV celebrates with our new story on the history of gopher tortoises in Jackson and Washington Counties, Florida. Just click play to watch:

If you would like to learn even more about gopher tortoises, please consider this nicely produced story from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC). Just click play to watch:

Here are some links for additional information, including coloring sheets and activity books for kids:

Covered Bridge Trail in Blount County, Alabama

The Blount County Covered Bridge Trail is a self-guided driving tour to three charming and historic covered bridges. Click play to enjoy:

The Covered Bridge Trail is just a short distance north of the Birmingham metro area. The ideal place to begin your tour is in the county seat of Oneonta. From there, drive about five miles north on State Road 75 to the Horton Mill Covered Bridge.

Our next recommended stop is at Palisades Park, a beautiful mountain-top landmark that is known for its sheer bluffs, incredible views and historic structures. It is a great place for a picnic!

From Palisades Park, continue to the Easley Covered Bridge. This lightly traveled bridge is the smallest of the covered bridges in Blount County and is very scenic.

The final stop on the Blount County Covered Bridge Trail is the most impressive! The historic Swann Covered Bridge spans a beautiful rocky gorge and is the longest covered bridge in Alabama.

Here are some additional photographs of the bridges for your enjoyment. Blount County has more covered bridges than any other county in Alabama and all three have been beautifully restored.

Horton Mill Covered Bridge in Blount County, Alabama.
Horton Mill Covered Bridge in Blount County, Alabama.
Another view of the Horton Mill Covered Bridge.
Another view of the Horton Mill Covered Bridge.
Blount County is the "Covered Bridge Capital of Alabama."
Blount County is the “Covered Bridge Capital of Alabama.”
The Swann Covered Bridge is the longest covered bridge in Alabama.
The Swann Covered Bridge is the longest covered bridge in Alabama.

Skunk Ape at Falling Waters State Park??!!

Did a visitor spot a Skunk Ape or Bigfoot at Falling Waters State Park in Chipley, Florida?!

A woman claims that she did so our Two Egg TV investigators went to take a look! Here’s what we found:

The waterfall is seasonal but was flowing beautifully during our visit (April 4, 2017). The spring leaves are out and the park was gorgeous (even if we didn’t see a Bigfoot!).

Click here to read the original story on this sighting from BackPackerVerse: http://backpackerverse.com/chipley-creature-appalachian-trail/

To learn more about this fantastic park, please visit: www.exploresouthernhistory.com/fallingwaters1.html